Interview with Dr.Nianda Reid
1) Tell us about yourself and where you grew up (background, etc.) My name is Dr. Nianda Reid @dr.niandareid and I’m a board-certified Dermatologist (Brown University Dermatology). I practice Medical, Surgical and Cosmetic Dermatology in Doylestown PA (outside of Philadelphia). 2) What inspired you to study medicine? I fell in love with Dermatology on a volunteer trip to Malawi Africa […]

1) Tell us about yourself and where you grew up (background, etc.) My name is Dr. Nianda Reid @dr.niandareid and I’m a board-certified Dermatologist (Brown University Dermatology). I practice Medical, Surgical and Cosmetic Dermatology in Doylestown PA (outside of Philadelphia). 
2) What inspired you to study medicine? I fell in love with Dermatology on a volunteer trip to Malawi Africa doing infectious disease dermatology, and seeing the impact that skin disease had on patients’ lives.
3)Briefly describe what it is like in the day in the life of a dermatologist

On a typical day I see patients from the newborn stage to the elderly population and treat a number of acute and chronic medical dermatology conditions.  A lot of dermatology is diagnostic and procedural (collecting skin scrapings and looking under a microscope, examining a skin lesion under a dermatoscope, doing skin biopsies to rule out skin cancer). On other days (surgery and procedural days), I do skin cancer excisions and destructive procedures for treatment of pre-cancerous lesions and skin cancer. There is also a component of cosmetic dermatology where I perform neurotoxin injections, fillers and laser dermatology.  At the end of any day, there is an administrative component of our jobs as physicians; including the completion of patient charts, notes, prior authorizations for medications/procedures, calling patients to discuss biopsy results and treatment follow up.4) What is some advice you have for high schoolers and college students who want to study medicine? If interested in pursuing a degree in the medical field, it is helpful to shadow a physician, volunteer in a medical setting (hospital), seek out research opportunities and find a mentor in the field.
5) What was your experience in terms of diversity in STEM (race, gender, social status, etc.) My high school in Brooklyn NY was under-served and under-funded. My opportunity for STEM exposure was limited in my home high school which propelled me to seek college level courses in science and math at a nearby university.
6) When and how did you start doing your first research projects? I started science research in high school by volunteering at a nearby hospital and seeking out research opportunities and programs available for high school students.
7) What are some obstacles you faced in getting to be a doctor and study medicine? I attended an under-served and under-funded public high school in Brooklyn NY. I had to take the train an hour each way to take college courses as I needed more opportunity to even the playing field if I were to even compete with my peers.